Our research

There are hundreds of neurological conditions. 

We fund the best research to discover the causes, develop new treatments, and improve the lives of those affected by these conditions.

We are currently focusing our research funding on three priority areas: acquired brain and spinal cord injury, brain tumours, and headache and facial pain. These are areas that we have identified as having a large unmet patient need, coupled with a lack of current research investment. Find out more about these priority areas. 

Cutting across research boundaries

Because we can fund research across the full range of neurological conditions, we can facilitate the translation of advances across different areas of brain research. 

For example, we supported the introduction of deep brain stimulation (DBS) to the UK. DBS is a neurosurgical procedure in which a patient has an electrode inserted into a part of their brain and a stimulator implanted in their chest. It works as a ‘brain pacemaker’, sending electrical impulses to specific targets in the brain for the treatment of movement and psychiatric disorders. DBS was first used to treat the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease and is now also in epilepsy, cluster headache and dystonia. We continue to fund research to refine the use of DBS. Read more. 

Our research

Our research grants are awarded through openly advertised, competitive calls and follow a rigorous peer review process. We currently run two annual calls for applications – one for PhD studentships and one for project grants.

In addition, we hold a small number of restricted endowment funds through which we fund ongoing projects at UCL Institute of Neurology. 

You can read about our current projects below. Or find out about the different neurological conditions where we are actively funding research, and search by disease area here.  

Current research

Lorem

Professor Chris Jones, The Institute of Cancer Research

The search for new treatments for the childhood brainstem tumour DIPG

Read More
Lorem

Professor Nick Ward, UCL Institute of Neurology

Investigating spontaneous early recovery after stroke

Read More
Lorem

Professor Simone Di Giovanni, Imperial College London

Regeneration and recovery following spinal cord injury

Read More
Lorem

Professor Peter McNaughton, King's College London

A new approach to the treatment of migraine

Read More
Lorem

Oakley Morgan, University College London

Stress, orofacial pain and headache disorders (PhD studentship)

Read More
Lorem

Rhiannon Barrow, University of Leeds

Overcoming treatment resistance in glioblastoma (PhD studentship)

Read More
Lorem

Franziska Mueller, Imperial College London

Restoring function after spinal cord injury (PhD studentship)

Read More
Lorem

Professor Sven Bestmann, UCL Institute of Neurology

When and how should we apply brain stimulation to help recovery after stroke?

Read More
Lorem

Dr Lawrence Moon, King’s College London

Testing a new therapy to promote recovery from stroke

Read More
Lorem

Dr Claudia Barros, Plymouth University

Understanding the cellular changes leading to the formation of the brain tumour glioblastoma

Read More
Lorem

Dr Emer O'Connor, UCL Institute of Neurology

Understanding the causes of cluster headache (PhD studentship)

Read More
Lorem

Richard Baugh, University of Oxford

Targeted immunotherapy of glioblastoma (PhD studentship)

Read More
Lorem

Martha McLaughlin, UCL Institute of Neurology

Understanding the mechanisms of motor neurone disease (PhD studentship)

Read More
Lorem

Professor Rob Brownstone, UCL Institute of Neurology

Brain Research UK Chair of Neurosurgery

Read More
Lorem

Professor Linda Greensmith, UCL Institute of Neurology

Motor neurone disease: from bench to bedside

Read More

Are you a researcher?

Keep up-to-date with our latest funding opportunities.

Your privacy

Your privacy is important to us.  We will always treat the personal information you have provided with care and respect and it will be stored securely.  We will never share, swap or sell your details to any other organisation for their purposes. For further information of why and how we use your personal information please see our Privacy Policy